Project News

American Segmental Bridge Institute | Fall 2018 Segments

Rendering of the new concrete segmental cable-stayed Ship Channel Bridge carrying the Sam Houston Tollway (East), featuring a 1,320-foot main span over the Houston Ship Channel. (Rendering courtesy of FIGG.)

The New Ship Channel Bridge on the
Sam Houston Tollway

 

A PRECAST SEGMENTAL CABLE STAYED BRIDGE FOR HARRIS COUNTY TOLL ROAD AUTHORITY (HCTRA)

Construction is underway on the new precast segmental cable-stayed Ship Channel Bridge in Houston, Texas for HCTRA. This world-class signature bridge on the Sam Houston Tollway (East) will replace the existing Jesse H. Jones Bridge, a cast-in-place segmental box girder structure that was built in 1982. Although the existing bridge is in excellent condition, a projected growth in traffic to almost triple what it is today demanded an increase in travel lanes from 2 to 4 lanes in each direction with full 10-foot shoulders and keep the new bridge in existing right of way. HCTRA elected to span the Houston Ship Channel waterway completely to accommodate future widening and deepening planned by the Port of Houston, resulting in a main span length between pylons of 1,320 feet. The 175-foot vertical clearance to the channel matches that of the Fred Hartman cable-stayed bridge located at the entrance to Galveston Bay.

Although the existing bridge is in excellent condition, a projected growth in traffic to almost triple what it is today demanded an increase in travel lanes from 2 to 4 lanes in each direction with full 10-foot shoulders and keep the new bridge in existing right of way.

Six teams competed to build this first phase of the project, and Ship Channel Constructors (SCC) a Joint Venture between Traylor Bros. Inc., and Zachry Construction Corporation won the best-value competition with a bid of $568 million. The contract value includes construction of new southbound bridge approach bridges, the full concrete segmental cable-stayed main bridge in both travel directions, and the removal of the existing bridge’s segmental main span unit. It is the largest single contract ever advertised by Harris County.

 

Construction Notice to Proceed was given on March 19, 2018. Cofferdam sheetpiling has been installed at both main pylon foundations. Work is ongoing to construct the drilled shaft foundations for the back-span piers and the main pylons, the deepest 8-foot diameter shafts extending to depths of 240 feet due to the poor soils in the Houston area. Work on the footings and pylon legs is expected to start Spring 2019. Designed by FIGG, the 2,720-foot-long cable-stayed main bridge features 556 precast segments, each 81'-9" wide, 12'-1" deep, and weighing in at 135 tons. SCC is constructing a casting yard directly adjacent to the project site to produce these segments and has procured casting machines from DEAL that will produce segments using the long line match-casting method. Casting is expected to start in late 2018. Segment lifters will erect the segments in balanced-cantilever from each of the two pylons concurrently. To maintain traffic on the Tollway at all times, the new bridge is being built in phases. The new Southbound Bridge will be opened to temporary bi-directional traffic in fall 2021 and overall project completion is expected in late 2024. This bridge was featured in Roads & Bridges Magazine in February 2018.

View the original article at ASBI Segments.

The Lesner Bridge replacement project is made up of two identical parallel precast segmental bridges that pass over the Lynnhaven Inlet of Chesapeake Bay on Shore Dr. (Hwy 60)
in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

New Lesner Bridge in Virginia Beach

 

OPENS AUGUST 31, 2018.

The Lesner Bridge replacement project is made up of two identical parallel precast segmental bridges that pass over the Lynnhaven Inlet of Chesapeake Bay on Shore Dr. (Hwy 60) in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Each bridge has two lanes of vehicular traffic and a multi-use pathway for pedestrians and cyclists. The bridge provides a 45-foot vertical clearance above mean high water and 225-foot horizontal clearance at the navigation channel. The complete bridge was open to traffic on August 31, 2018. The segmental bridge design was accomplished by FIGG. 

The project uses both span-by-span construction and unidirectional cantilever construction methods to build the superstructure.

The precast superstructure segments incorporate an integral wearing surface with low permeability, high compressive strength concrete mix, and the deck was post-tensioned longitudinally and transversely. These provisions enhance the concrete decks resistance to chloride penetration given the coastal environment. The project uses both span-by-span construction (150' spans) and unidirectional cantilever construction (225’ span) methods to build the superstructure. The individual box girder segments are constructed at a local facility approximately 17 miles from the erection site. After the segments are created, they are delivered to the bridge site by either truck or barge, for assembly. Superstructure erection was accomplished with a DEAL overhead erection truss. The system allowed superstructure erection to take place by transport of segments over the previously erected superstructure or to be hoisted into place from below.

 

Two casting cells were used to manufacture the 336 segments for the project. Each cell could cast typical segments with one cell being modified for specialty segments. The new bridge reflects the community’s aesthetic preferences while achieving low maintenance and efficient structure with openness, uniformity, and vision for the future. 

View the original article at ASBI Segments.

Rendering of the new Cline Avenue Bridge, a precast segmental bridge for
East Chicago, Indiana. (Rendering courtesy of FIGG.)

Cline Avenue Bridge

 

A PRECAST SEGMENTAL SOLUTION FOR INDIANA STATE HIGHWAY UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN EAST CHICAGO.

Construction started in July 2017 on the new 6,236-ft long Cline Avenue Bridge over the Indiana Harbor Canal in East Chicago, Indiana. The new two-lane precast, concrete segmental bridge replaces Indiana State Route 912 that was closed by INDOT in 2009 due to deteriorating conditions. This new bridge is privately funded and will re-establish the 3.5-mile link between Calumet and Michigan Avenues and remove the detours that placed increased traffic on local streets and bridges. The bridge site allows for future expansion of the facility to meet increased traffic demands with a second, parallel bridge. 

The precast segmental concrete bridge has span lengths varying from 142'- 8" to 292'- 2" and a main span over the canal of 315' – 7". All spans are being erected in the balanced cantilever method of construction. The 28 cantilevers typically consist of 9'-1" deep constant depth segments, which increase to a maximum depth of 14'-1" on the longer spans. The 46'-0" wide box girder segments typically weigh 65 tons, with the variable depth pier segments controlling the maximum weight of 90 tons. There are 685 precast segments that are being fabricated in a precast yard set up within the Cline Avenue Bridge property. The precast yard features three casting cells inside a building for typical segments and one casting cell for pier segments outside the building. One of the cells inside the building is convertible and can be used to cast special segments. Reinforcing cages are tied on jigs, transferred to carts and rolled into the building. Overhead cranes in the building move the pre-tied rebar cages to the casting cells. After the segments are cast they are rolled out the side of the building and moved to the storage yard with the shuttle lift.

 

As much as possible, segments are stored along the length of the spans to be in position for direct assembly in cantilever construction. FIGG Bridge Builders is the Engineer Procure Construct (EPC) Contractor for the project and is self-performing the precasting through Cline Precast, LLC. Substantial completion of the new bridge is planned for January 2020.

As much as possible, segments are stored along the length 
of the spans to be in position for direct assembly in cantilever construction.

View the original article at ASBI Segments.

The New Sarah Mildred Long Bridge includes 2,803’ of vehicular Bridge and 1,795’ of railroad service across the Piscataqua River Built with a precast concrete segmental design.
(Photo courtesy of FIGG)

New Sarah Mildred Long Bridge

 

OPENED MARCH 30, 2018 CONNECTING KITTERY, MAINE AND PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE.

The New Sarah Mildred Long Bridge Replacement Project is the result of a partnership between Maine and New Hampshire’s Departments of Transportation; the two states equally shared the costs of replacing the bridge. Maine DOT led the project on behalf of both states, with support from the Federal Highway Administration. The bridge features over 2,803 feet of precast segmental bridge for vehicles above a 1,795-foot precast segmental heavy rail bridge. Design was by FIGG/Hardesty & Hanover, Joint Venture, with FIGG accomplishing the segmental bridge spans. The project team worked together to understand the community’s vision of the bridge aesthetic preferences which was achieved through creating a precast concrete segmental bridge design and a lift span over the main channel. The design centered around the community’s theme: “Local simplicity of the Working Waterway”. 

The new bridge creates an aesthetically pleasing solution using segmental technology.

Long open span lengths of 320ft. for the vehicle bridge were built in balanced cantilever construction. The heavy rail spans of (Cooper E80 loading) of 160ft. tie with the columns of the vehicle bridge and have interim foundations. These spans were built using the balanced cantilever method also the towers/piers of the life span are made of precast concrete segments with hollow sections shaped to accommodate the lifting mechanisms. The new bridge creates an aesthetically pleasing solution using segmental technology. 

View the original article at ASBI Segments.

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